Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11765/14140
Utilizing homogenized observation records and reconstructed time series data to estimate recent trends in Mid-Atlantic soil moisture scarcity
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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Robert Kennedyes_ES
dc.contributor.authorGuijarro Pastor, José Antonioes_ES
dc.contributor.authorChang, Der-Chenes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-07T09:13:41Z-
dc.date.available2022-11-07T09:13:41Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationTheoretical and Applied Climatology. 2021, 143, 1063–1076es_ES
dc.identifier.issn0177-798X-
dc.identifier.issn1434-4483-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11765/14140-
dc.description.abstractThe Mid-Atlantic region of the USA has experienced increasing annual precipitation amounts in recent decades, along with more frequent extreme events of greater magnitude. Unlike many US regions that have suffered increasing drought conditions from higher evapotranspiration demand, positive trends in the Mid-Atlantic accumulated precipitation are greater than the recent increases in reference evapotranspiration. The temporal correlation between precipitation events and soil moisture capacity is essential for determining how the nature of drought has changed in the region. This analysis has shown that soil moisture scarcity has declined in nine of ten subregions of the Mid-Atlantic that were analyzed from 1985 to 2019. Two algorithms were deployed to draw this conclusion: Climatol enabled the use of the FAO-56 Penman-Monteith equation on daily observation station data for which complete records were unavailable, and the second algorithm calculated soil moisture levels on a daily basis, more accurately capturing drought conditions than common methods using weekly or monthly summaries. Although the declining drought trends were not statistically significant, a result of more extreme events and higher evapotranspiration rates, the inclusion of direct data from an expanded set of locations provides greater clarity from the trends, allowing policymakers and landowners to anticipate changes in future Mid-Atlantic irrigation water demand.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherSpringeres_ES
dc.rightsLicencia CC: Reconocimiento CC BYes_ES
dc.subjectDroughtes_ES
dc.subjectSeries dataes_ES
dc.subjectSoil moisture scarcityes_ES
dc.subjectAlgorithmses_ES
dc.titleUtilizing homogenized observation records and reconstructed time series data to estimate recent trends in Mid-Atlantic soil moisture scarcityes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00704-020-03467-yes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
Appears in Collections:Artículos científicos 2019-2022


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